Tag Archives: healthcare

If 26 Year Olds Are Children…

The other day, a caller on the Rush Limbaugh show made an interesting observation:

If 26 year olds are children (as they will be considered under Obamacare), then they shouldn’t be drinking or voting.

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Law of unintended consequences

Every law has unintended consequences. We don’t usually find out about them until it’s too late and the cure is sometimes worse than the disease.

I just thought of a possible one for Obamacare.

It’s been thoroughly discussed that “children” may be left on their parent’s insurance through 26 years old. Now combine this with the mandate to purchase and you have an interesting possible scenario:

Mom and Dad want/need to remove an 18-26 year old adult “child” from their insurance policy (for any of various reasons). Will they be able to? Since this adult is legally dependent on them (in at least one way) are they still legally responsible for the mandate to purchase for their “child”?

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What is “historic”?

I’m sick and tired of hearing people blather on and on about how “historic” the health care takeover is. Historic doesn’t mean good.

9/11 was historic.
Pearl Harbor was historic.
Kristallnacht was historic.
the Alamo was historic.

That doesn’t mean they were good.

Passing something this blatantly unconstitutional and tyrannical against incredible public opposition is certainly historic. That doesn’t mean that this is a good thing.

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Four Arguments Against Fed Health Ins Requirements

The Colorado Tenth Amendment Center recently posted the article:
Can Colorado “opt out” of Obama Care?

This article provides four powerful arguments against those who erroneously claim: “Well, you have to get car insurance.”


One of the justifications we hear for this mandate is Auto Insurance. That people have to buy auto insurance is held up as proof that government has this power. There are four things I ask you to consider before you make up your mind. First, driving an automobile on public roads is a privilege not an unalienable right like “life”. Second, those are state laws, not Federal, and the States have far more powers then the constitutionally limited federal government. Third, the law only requires you carry insurance to cover damages you may do to someone else, not yourself. And finally, you can choose not to drive an automobile on public roads and avoid having to buy insurance. These four facts completely invalidate this argument for anyone who considers this question objectively.


To summarize in handy list fashion:

1.) Driving an automobile on public roads is a privilege, not an unalienable right like “life”.

2.)
Those are state laws, not Federal, and the States have far more powers then the constitutionally limited federal government.

3.)
The law only requires you carry insurance to cover damages you may do to someone else, not yourself.

4.) You can choose not to drive an automobile on public roads and avoid having to buy insurance.

I’ve made argument #4 before, though not as eloquently.


You don’t have to get car insurance to own a car. If I buy a car and I leave it sitting in my garage, I don’t have to insure it. (Although, I might want to insure it as a collectable if it is a classic.)

Also, you can drive on private property without insurance, as long as you don’t venture out onto public roads. Many farmers and ranchers maintain old pickup trucks that they only use on their property. These vehicles do not have to be insured or inspected. Also, you don’t have to be licensed to drive them. Many teens and preteens grow up driving the old truck around the farm before they’re ever allowed to drive on public roads.

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Obama’s Sob Story

In a recent press conference, President Obama told a (presumably hypothetical) sob story that, to him, illustrated why no one should be allowed to be without health insurance.  He spoke of a man who chose to not have insurance who experienced a medical catastrophe and woke up in the hospital to find himself $10,000 in debt.

If President Obama cares so much about people getting in massive debt then why is he in the process of continually increasing the national debt? Why is he increasing the debt that each of us must pay off, though we did not authorize it, though we demanded they not pursue it. Does he not care that every baby born in this country is born a debtor?

 

http://www.brillig.com/debt_clock/

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The Right to Privacy and Medical Records.

One of the original arguments in favor of legalized abortion was the right to privacy.

However, now our government wants to violate any privacy we might have by seizing our medical records and placing them in a database maintained by a government contractor. If I have a right to privacy, then what right does the government have to my medical records? What right does GE or any other private company have to them either?

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H.R. 3200 (the healthcare bill) Is Unconstitutional Ex Post Facto Law.

 “Except as provided in this paragraph, the individual health insurance issuer offering such coverage does not enroll any individual in such coverage if the first effective date of coverage is on or after the first day of Y1.”    – excerpt from H.R. 3200 (the healthcare bill)

Correct me if I’m reading this wrong, but doesn’t that back date the law’s effectiveness to January 1, 2009?  Let’s say I took out a policy on February 1, 2009. If this bill becomes law, would it render my policy illegal?

“No bill of attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.” – U.S. Constitution: Article 1, Section 9.  An ex post facto law is a retroactive law, that is, one that makes something illegal before the law was passed.

Could someone explain to me how this is not an unconstitutional ex post facto law? If my reading of the bill is correct, it would render any policy made on or after January 1, 2009 null and void after the fact.

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